Today in U.S. History, Religious Instruction in Public Schools was Banned

 
On this date in 1948, the landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision, McCollum v. Board of Education, barring religious instruction in public schools was handed down.

“Separation means separation, not something less. Jefferson’s metaphor in describing the relation between Church and State speaks of a ‘wall of separation,’ not a fine line easily overstepped. The public school is at once the symbol of our democracy and the most pervasive means for promoting our common destiny. In no activity of the State is it more vital to keep out divisive forces than in its schools, to avoid confusing, not to say fusing, what the Constitution sought to keep strictly apart. ‘The great American principle of eternal separation’ — Elihu Root’s phrase bears repetition — is one of the vital reliances of our Constitutional system for assuring unities among our people stronger than our diversities. It is the Court’s duty to enforce this principle in its full integrity.”

—Justice Frankfurter, concurrence, McCollum v. Board of Education, 333 U.S. 203, 212 (1948)

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Civil Rights, Education, Religion, Secularism. Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Today in U.S. History, Religious Instruction in Public Schools was Banned

  1. DeltaV says:

    Tim, are you trying to IMPLY that SAT scores dropped when religion was removed from public schools in the 1950s?

    First, your graph doesn’t show SAT data before 1966, let alone 1950 when religion was removed from public schools.

    Second, how do you account for SAT scores RISING from 1980-1984 and again from 1990-1994? I don’t remember religion being RE-INTRODUCED back in to public schools during those time periods.

    Third, there are MANY factors that cause average SAT scores to rise or drop, NONE of which this graph addresses.

    Correlation proves causation, is a logical fallacy by which two events that occur together are claimed to have a cause-and-effect relationship. The fallacy is also known as cum hoc ergo propter hoc (Latin for “with this, therefore because of this”) and false cause.

  2. 1948…
    Religious indoctrination in public schools has existed in the US more years than it hasn’t been allowed.

What you think about this?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s